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APSAC Advisor

The APSAC Advisor is a peer reviewed quarterly news journal for professionals in the field of child abuse and neglect. The APSAC Advisor provides succinct, data-based, practice-oriented articles that keep interdisciplinary professionals informed of the latest developments in policy and practice the field of child maltreatment. It is designed to highlight best practices in the field and publish original articles and current information about child maltreatment for professionals from a variety of backgrounds including medicine, law, law enforcement, social work, child protective services, psychology, public health and prevention in the U.S.

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This library contains Advisor issues dating back to 1990. The most recent issue appears at the top. Scroll down to select past issues by year and issue number. Once a publication appears in the box, you can use the Enlarge button to open the document in a new window or tab (depending on how your browser is set up). This will allow you to view the document with larger print.

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Directory

In the listing below, click on a year and issue number to see the articles in that publication.

2008 Number 1

At Issue: Musings on Policy

(Jerry Friedman)

Dean Atchison once wrote that “the purpose of memos is seldom, if ever, to inform the reader. Rather, they are almost always intended to protect the writer.” I think the same could be true for much of the policy development activity that occurs in human services today. At Issue is why so much of our policy work is focused on federal rules compliance and program protection that we sometimes run the risk of overlooking our primary purpose of helping clients achieve better outcomes.


Defining Child Neglect: Principles for Practice

(Howard Dubowitz, MD, MS)

Neglect is the most frequently identified form of child maltreatment (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2007), but a lack of agreement on its definition and difficulties assessing neglect have impeded clinical work and research on this problem (Zuravin, 2001). A clear definition of neglect is not an academic exercise. How we think about a problem influences our practice. Several issues pertaining to defining neglect are presented, together with suggestions for applying these ideas in practice.


Developmental Outcomes of Child Neglect

(Maria Scannapieco, PhD, MSW)

In 2005 in the United States, 62% of all confirmed victims of child maltreatment were victims of neglect (USDHHS, 2005). Neglected children are more likely to be younger, and the highest rate of victimization is in the 0-3 age group (USDHHS, 2005). The most devastating consequence of neglect is death, and in 2005 the majority of deaths due to maltreatment were due to neglect (USDHHS, 2005). Overall, the rate of child fatality due to neglect ranges from 32% (Delambre & Wood, 1997) to 42% (USDHHS, 2005; Wang & Daro, 1998) of all reported child death cases.


Journal Highlights

(Tamara Davis, PhD, Beth Ann Rodriguez, MSW)

The purpose of Journal Highlights is to alert readers to current literature on child abuse. Selected articles from journals representing the variety of disciplines reflected in APSAC's membership are presented in the form of an annotated bibliography.


SafeCare(tm): An Evidence-Based Approach to Prevent Child Neglect

(Debra B. Hecht, PhD, Jane F. Silovsky, PhD, Mark Chaffin, PhD, John R. Lutzker, PhD)

SafeCare(tm) is a derivation of the original Project 12-Ways model developed by Lutzker and colleagues (Lutzker, 1984; Lutzker & Bigelow, 2002). This model has been used and evaluated in university-based projects in rural Illinois since 1979, in university-based projects in Los Angeles (Lutzker, 1984; Lutzker, Tymchuk, & Bigelow, 2001), and currently in Kansas, Michigan, Georgia, and in two field trials in Oklahoma. The model has been described in over 60 publications, covering the model itself, research, and outcome evaluations, and in more than 100 presentations.


2021 Number 1

2020 Number 2

2020 Number 1

2019 Number 3

2019 Number 2

2019 Number 1

2018 Number 4

2018 Number 3

2018 Number 2

2018 Number 1

2017 Number 2

2017 Number 1

2016 Number 2

2016 Number 1

2015 Number 1

2014 Number 2

2014 Number 1

2013 Number 4

2013 Number 3

2013 Number 2

2013 Number 1

2012 Number 4

2012 Number 3

2012 Number 2

2012 Number 1

2011 Number 4

2011 Number 3

2011 Number 2

2011 Number 1

2010 Number 4

2010 Number 3

2010 Number 2

2010 Number 1

2009 Number 3 and 4

2009 Number 2

2009 Number 1

2008 Number 3 and 4

2008 Number 2

2008 Number 1

2007 Number 4

2007 Number 3

2007 Number 1 and 2

2006 Number 4

2006 Number 3

2006 Number 2

2006 Number 1

2005 Number 4

2005 Number 3

2005 Number 2

2005 Number 1

2004 Number 4

2004 Number 3

2004 Number 2

2004 Number 1

2003 Number 4

2003 Number 3

2003 Number 2

2003 Number 1

2002 Number 4

2002 Number 3

2002 Number 2

2002 Number 1

2000-2001 Number 3 and 4

2000-2001 Number 2

2000-2001 Number 1

1999 Number 4

1999 Number 3

1999 Number 2

1999 Number 1

1998 Number 4

1998 Number 3

1998 Number 2

1998 Number 1

1997 Number 4

1997 Number 3

1997 Number 2

1997 Number 1

1996 Number 4

1996 Number 3

1996 Number 2

1996 Number 1

1995 Number 4

1995 Number 3

1995 Number 2

1995 Number 1

1994 Number 4

1994 Number 3

1994 Number 2

1994 Number 1

1993 Number 4

1993 Number 3

1993 Number 2

1993 Number 1

1992 Number 4

1992 Number 3

1992 Number 2

1992 Number 1

1991 Number 4

1991 Number 3

1991 Number 2

1991 Number 1

1990 Number 4

1990 Number 3

1990 Number 2

1990 Number 1