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APSAC Advisor

The APSAC Advisor is a peer reviewed quarterly news journal for professionals in the field of child abuse and neglect. The APSAC Advisor provides succinct, data-based, practice-oriented articles that keep interdisciplinary professionals informed of the latest developments in policy and practice the field of child maltreatment. It is designed to highlight best practices in the field and publish original articles and current information about child maltreatment for professionals from a variety of backgrounds including medicine, law, law enforcement, social work, child protective services, psychology, public health and prevention in the U.S.

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This library contains Advisor issues dating back to 1990. The most recent issue appears at the top. Scroll down to select past issues by year and issue number. Once a publication appears in the box, you can use the Enlarge button to open the document in a new window or tab (depending on how your browser is set up). This will allow you to view the document with larger print.

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Directory

In the listing below, click on a year and issue number to see the articles in that publication.

2012 Number 2

25 Years of APSAC - A Personal Historical, Law Enforcement Perspective

(Kenneth V. Lanning, MS)

In May 1970, I began my 30-year career as a special agent with the FBI. Early in that career, I also became involved as an instructor in the FBI’s field police training program. After 10 years as a field investigator and part-time police instructor and getting my Master’s degree, I was transferred to the FBI Behavioral Science Unit (BSU) at the FBI Academy in Quantico. I was assigned to this Unit from January 1981 until I retired from the FBI in September 2000. Although the BSU was part of the FBI’s Training Division, its work involved more and more research and operational case consultation as well as training.


Prosecuting Child Physical Abuse and Homicide Cases: How Things Have Changed Since the Creation of APSAC

(Robert N. Parrish, JD )

Criminal prosecution of cases involving the physical abuse of young children or in which children have passed away as a result of inflicted injuries continues to present challenges not often encountered in other forms of criminal prosecution. It has always been accepted that almost all acts of child abuse occur in secrecy, with no other eyewitnesses unless the witness is also involved in the abuse or is too young to provide reliable testimony. Almost without exception, this leaves prosecuting attorneys with the difficult task of proving what happened, who did it, and when it happened through circumstantial evidence. In some cases it is clear that someone inflicted an injury or set of injuries upon the child; however, in other cases the injuries may have been the result of accident or may have been inflicted by another person and only thorough investigation allow proof beyond a reasonable doubt that they were caused by abuse.


Evidence-Based Mental Health Treatment: A 25-Year Glance at Past, Present and Future

(Monica M. Fitzgerald, PhD, and Lucy Berliner, MSW)

The 25th anniversary of the American Professional Society for the Abuse of Children (APSAC) calls us to reflect on how far mental health treatment for abused and neglected children and their families has come over this quarter century and the role of APSAC in shifting traditional thinking about children’s mental health needs.


The Promise of Prevention: Expanding With Quality

(Deborah Daro, PhD )

Despite recent declines in substantiated cases of physical abuse and neglect, child maltreatment remains a substantial threat to a child’s well-being and healthy development. In 2009, over 3 million children were reported as potential victims of maltreatment. The risk for harm is particularly high for children living in the most disadvantaged communities, including those living in extreme poverty or those living with caretakers who are unable or unwilling to care for them due to chronic problems of substance abuse, mental health disorders, or domestic violence. In 2009, an estimated 1,770 children - or over 4.8 children a day were identified as fatal victims of maltreatment. As in the past, the majority of these children - over 80% - were under the age of 4 (USDHHS, 2011). While child maltreatment is neither inevitable nor intractable, protecting children remains challenging.


Journal Highlights

(Howard Fischer, MD)

The purpose of Journal Highlights is to alert readers to current literature on child abuse. Selected articles from journals representing the variety of disciplines reflected in APSAC's membership are presented in the form of an annotated bibliography.


2021 Number 1

2020 Number 2

2020 Number 1

2019 Number 3

2019 Number 2

2019 Number 1

2018 Number 4

2018 Number 3

2018 Number 2

2018 Number 1

2017 Number 2

2017 Number 1

2016 Number 2

2016 Number 1

2015 Number 1

2014 Number 2

2014 Number 1

2013 Number 4

2013 Number 3

2013 Number 2

2013 Number 1

2012 Number 4

2012 Number 3

2012 Number 2

2012 Number 1

2011 Number 4

2011 Number 3

2011 Number 2

2011 Number 1

2010 Number 4

2010 Number 3

2010 Number 2

2010 Number 1

2009 Number 3 and 4

2009 Number 2

2009 Number 1

2008 Number 3 and 4

2008 Number 2

2008 Number 1

2007 Number 4

2007 Number 3

2007 Number 1 and 2

2006 Number 4

2006 Number 3

2006 Number 2

2006 Number 1

2005 Number 4

2005 Number 3

2005 Number 2

2005 Number 1

2004 Number 4

2004 Number 3

2004 Number 2

2004 Number 1

2003 Number 4

2003 Number 3

2003 Number 2

2003 Number 1

2002 Number 4

2002 Number 3

2002 Number 2

2002 Number 1

2000-2001 Number 3 and 4

2000-2001 Number 2

2000-2001 Number 1

1999 Number 4

1999 Number 3

1999 Number 2

1999 Number 1

1998 Number 4

1998 Number 3

1998 Number 2

1998 Number 1

1997 Number 4

1997 Number 3

1997 Number 2

1997 Number 1

1996 Number 4

1996 Number 3

1996 Number 2

1996 Number 1

1995 Number 4

1995 Number 3

1995 Number 2

1995 Number 1

1994 Number 4

1994 Number 3

1994 Number 2

1994 Number 1

1993 Number 4

1993 Number 3

1993 Number 2

1993 Number 1

1992 Number 4

1992 Number 3

1992 Number 2

1992 Number 1

1991 Number 4

1991 Number 3

1991 Number 2

1991 Number 1

1990 Number 4

1990 Number 3

1990 Number 2

1990 Number 1