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APSAC Advisor

The APSAC Advisor is a peer reviewed quarterly news journal for professionals in the field of child abuse and neglect. The APSAC Advisor provides succinct, data-based, practice-oriented articles that keep interdisciplinary professionals informed of the latest developments in policy and practice the field of child maltreatment. It is designed to highlight best practices in the field and publish original articles and current information about child maltreatment for professionals from a variety of backgrounds including medicine, law, law enforcement, social work, child protective services, psychology, public health and prevention in the U.S.

If you wish to learn more about submitting an article to the Advisor, please click here.

This library contains Advisor issues dating back to 1990. The most recent issue appears at the top. Scroll down to select past issues by year and issue number. Once a publication appears in the box, you can use the Enlarge button to open the document in a new window or tab (depending on how your browser is set up). This will allow you to view the document with larger print.

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Directory

In the listing below, click on a year and issue number to see the articles in that publication.

2020 Number 1

Intrafamilial Child Torture: Training Mandated Reporters

(Pamela J. Miller, JD, MSW, LISW-S)

Intrafamilial child torture (ICT) is an emerging category of child maltreatment coming to the widespread attention of child-serving professionals for the first time. This article will familiarize readers with ICT as a separate category of maltreatment, demonstrate the need for ICT to be expressly included in mandated reporter laws, and describe early efforts to train mandated reporters on ICT. The article will briefly describe the types of harm involved in ICT and the highly pathological family dynamics that lead to parents torturing their own children. The need for separate mandated reporter laws will be demonstrated by discussing ICT’s rarity, lethality, psychologically devastating consequences, and tendency to be missed or misbelieved. Finally, Miller’s beginner-level training on ICT will be described.


Advancing Trauma-Informed Programs in Schools to Promote Resilience and Child Well-Being

(Todd I. Herrenkohl, PhD; Sunghyun Hong, MSW; Bethany Verbrugge, MSW )

This article discusses the importance of trauma-informed schools and the goal of transforming education systems to become more attuned and responsive to the needs of children with trauma histories. We draw on findings of an earlier review of published studies in which we highlight current gaps in the literature and call for more empirical work to better establish the promise of systems-oriented, trauma-informed strategies. In the current article, we also highlight core components of these strategies and offer a number of recommendations for schools committed to ensuring that risk-exposed and traumatized children receive the supports and services they require to succeed in school, work, and life.


Introduction Parental Alienation: A Contested Concept

(Kathleen Coulborn Faller, PhD, ACSW, LMSW)


Seeking a Bridge Between Child Sexual Abuse and Parental Alienation Experts

(Madelyn Simring Milchman, PhD)


Parental Alienation Syndrome/Parental Alienation Disorder (PAS/PAD): A Critique of a ‘Disorder’ Frequently Used to Discount Allegations of Interpersonal Violence and Abuse in Child Custody Cases

(Robert Geffner, PhD, ABPP, ABN & Aileen Herlinda Sandoval, PsyD )


Can There Be a Bridge Between Interpersonal Violence/Abuse and Parental Alienation Proponents: A Response to Milchman

(Aileen Herlinda Sandoval, PsyD & Robert Geffner, PhD, ABPP, ABN )


Is a Critique of Parental Alienation Syndrome/Parental Alienation Disorder (PAS/PAD) Timely? A Response to Geffner and Sandoval

(Is a Critique of Parental Alienation Syndrome/Parental Alienation Disorder (PAS/PAD) Timely? A Response to Geffner and Sandoval)


2021 Number 1

2020 Number 2

2020 Number 1

2019 Number 3

2019 Number 2

2019 Number 1

2018 Number 4

2018 Number 3

2018 Number 2

2018 Number 1

2017 Number 2

2017 Number 1

2016 Number 2

2016 Number 1

2015 Number 1

2014 Number 2

2014 Number 1

2013 Number 4

2013 Number 3

2013 Number 2

2013 Number 1

2012 Number 4

2012 Number 3

2012 Number 2

2012 Number 1

2011 Number 4

2011 Number 3

2011 Number 2

2011 Number 1

2010 Number 4

2010 Number 3

2010 Number 2

2010 Number 1

2009 Number 3 and 4

2009 Number 2

2009 Number 1

2008 Number 3 and 4

2008 Number 2

2008 Number 1

2007 Number 4

2007 Number 3

2007 Number 1 and 2

2006 Number 4

2006 Number 3

2006 Number 2

2006 Number 1

2005 Number 4

2005 Number 3

2005 Number 2

2005 Number 1

2004 Number 4

2004 Number 3

2004 Number 2

2004 Number 1

2003 Number 4

2003 Number 3

2003 Number 2

2003 Number 1

2002 Number 4

2002 Number 3

2002 Number 2

2002 Number 1

2000-2001 Number 3 and 4

2000-2001 Number 2

2000-2001 Number 1

1999 Number 4

1999 Number 3

1999 Number 2

1999 Number 1

1998 Number 4

1998 Number 3

1998 Number 2

1998 Number 1

1997 Number 4

1997 Number 3

1997 Number 2

1997 Number 1

1996 Number 4

1996 Number 3

1996 Number 2

1996 Number 1

1995 Number 4

1995 Number 3

1995 Number 2

1995 Number 1

1994 Number 4

1994 Number 3

1994 Number 2

1994 Number 1

1993 Number 4

1993 Number 3

1993 Number 2

1993 Number 1

1992 Number 4

1992 Number 3

1992 Number 2

1992 Number 1

1991 Number 4

1991 Number 3

1991 Number 2

1991 Number 1

1990 Number 4

1990 Number 3

1990 Number 2

1990 Number 1